givemypoorheartease:

"It’s a Black Thing"
by Romare Bearden

givemypoorheartease:

"It’s a Black Thing"

by Romare Bearden

cavetocanvas:

Romare Bearden, Tomorrow I May Be Far Away, 1967
From the National Gallery of Art:

The title of this collage could refer to several of its details. In the top right quadrant a nearly camouflaged passing train with billowing smoke travels to an unknown location. The central figure, with a cigarette dangling from his mouth, appears lost in thought. A woman stares at the viewer with a disproportionately large eye, her hand on the windowsill. In the “background” (at right), blue birds fly. These elements and others recall Romare Bearden’s childhood in rural North Carolina and personify journeying, a central theme in African-American history. The train suggests the Underground Railroad—the network of abolitionist-run safe houses that secretly transported slaves—and the post-slavery migration of African-Americans, primarily northward, to seek better lives.
Born in Charlotte, North Carolina, and raised primarily in the surrounding Mecklenburg County, Bearden eventually settled in New York City to finish college at New York University. He was a social worker there for several decades, during which time he spent nights and weekends on his art. Originally an abstract painter, Bearden began creating collages in the early 1960s using images from photo-magazines such asLife and Ebony. He came up with the idea after suggesting it to the other members of Spiral, a group of New York artists formed to create art based on African-American issues. In addition to his unflinching, faceted images of black life, Bearden is remembered for his published books on art and aesthetics and for his political energy on behalf of black culture.

cavetocanvas:

Romare Bearden, Tomorrow I May Be Far Away, 1967

From the National Gallery of Art:

The title of this collage could refer to several of its details. In the top right quadrant a nearly camouflaged passing train with billowing smoke travels to an unknown location. The central figure, with a cigarette dangling from his mouth, appears lost in thought. A woman stares at the viewer with a disproportionately large eye, her hand on the windowsill. In the “background” (at right), blue birds fly. These elements and others recall Romare Bearden’s childhood in rural North Carolina and personify journeying, a central theme in African-American history. The train suggests the Underground Railroad—the network of abolitionist-run safe houses that secretly transported slaves—and the post-slavery migration of African-Americans, primarily northward, to seek better lives.

Born in Charlotte, North Carolina, and raised primarily in the surrounding Mecklenburg County, Bearden eventually settled in New York City to finish college at New York University. He was a social worker there for several decades, during which time he spent nights and weekends on his art. Originally an abstract painter, Bearden began creating collages in the early 1960s using images from photo-magazines such asLife and Ebony. He came up with the idea after suggesting it to the other members of Spiral, a group of New York artists formed to create art based on African-American issues. In addition to his unflinching, faceted images of black life, Bearden is remembered for his published books on art and aesthetics and for his political energy on behalf of black culture.

ratak-monodosico:

Panel in opus sectile with tiger assaulting a calf
Mosaic / Intarsia
First half of 4th century AD
Coloured marbles
Roman

(Source: Musei Capitolini)

ratak-monodosico:

Panel in opus sectile with tiger assaulting a calf

Mosaic / Intarsia
First half of 4th century AD
Coloured marbles
Roman

(Source: ancientpeoples, via cavetocanvas)

cavetocanvas:

lacma:

Two years ago, we launched an experiment: an online image library where we made 2,000 high-resolution images of artworks that the museum deemed to be in the public domain available for download without any restrictions.  This week, we’ve exceeded ourselves with the launch of our new collections website, giving away ten times the number of images we offered in the initial image library. Nearly 20,000 high-quality images of art from our collection are available to search, download, and use as you see fit.
What Do Cats Have to Do With It? Welcome to Our New Collections Website
Dear Tumblr-verse,
Merry Christmas: we just gave you 20,000 high-resolution images, for free. Now we have just one question: what are you going to do with them?

LACMA, I love you.
I certainly know how Cave to Canvas will be using those images!

cavetocanvas:

lacma:

Two years ago, we launched an experiment: an online image library where we made 2,000 high-resolution images of artworks that the museum deemed to be in the public domain available for download without any restrictions.  This week, we’ve exceeded ourselves with the launch of our new collections website, giving away ten times the number of images we offered in the initial image library. Nearly 20,000 high-quality images of art from our collection are available to search, download, and use as you see fit.

What Do Cats Have to Do With It? Welcome to Our New Collections Website

Dear Tumblr-verse,

Merry Christmas: we just gave you 20,000 high-resolution images, for free. Now we have just one question: what are you going to do with them?

LACMA, I love you.

I certainly know how Cave to Canvas will be using those images!

whitneymuseum:

American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe opens today. Each gallery on the Museum’s fifth-floor will be devoted to presentations of the leading artists of the first half of the twentieth century, providing an in-depth look at the beloved work of Edward Hopper, Stuart Davis, and other icons of the Whitney’s collection.
Charles Demuth (1883–1935), My Egypt, 1927. Oil on fiberboard, 35 3/4 × 30 in. (90.8 × 76.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney   31.172

whitneymuseum:

American Legends: From Calder to O’Keeffe opens today. Each gallery on the Museum’s fifth-floor will be devoted to presentations of the leading artists of the first half of the twentieth century, providing an in-depth look at the beloved work of Edward Hopper, Stuart Davis, and other icons of the Whitney’s collection.

Charles Demuth (1883–1935), My Egypt, 1927. Oil on fiberboard, 35 3/4 × 30 in. (90.8 × 76.2 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney   31.172

(via cavetocanvas)

hifas:

Phenomena series (1970) by Paul Jenkins

(via cavetocanvas)

efedra:

Branches Of An Almond Tree In Blossom (Artist Interpretation in Red), 1890
by Vincent Van Gogh

efedra:

Branches Of An Almond Tree In Blossom (Artist Interpretation in Red), 1890

by Vincent Van Gogh

(via artpedia)

cavetocanvas:

Chuck Close, Frank, 1969
Although his paintings are extraordinarily realistic, Chuck Close’s method of painting is grounded in abstraction. He divides his canvas into a grid and carefully fills in each piece with abstract marks, which ultimately come together to create a stunningly realistic final product. Close remarked that he wanted every square inch of the painting to be important as every other square inch, and wanted to make “stupid marks” rather than rely on virtuoso brushwork. Although the artist’s touch isn’t evident in Close’s work, the process becomes equally as important.

cavetocanvas:

Chuck Close, Frank, 1969

Although his paintings are extraordinarily realistic, Chuck Close’s method of painting is grounded in abstraction. He divides his canvas into a grid and carefully fills in each piece with abstract marks, which ultimately come together to create a stunningly realistic final product. Close remarked that he wanted every square inch of the painting to be important as every other square inch, and wanted to make “stupid marks” rather than rely on virtuoso brushwork. Although the artist’s touch isn’t evident in Close’s work, the process becomes equally as important.

cavetocanvas:

Kenny Scharf, When Worlds Collide, 1984

cavetocanvas:

Kenny Scharf, When Worlds Collide, 1984